Carl Hayden

Senator Carl Hayden served Arizona from 1927 through 1968, becoming the longest serving Senator in US history at the time he retired. His legislative work transformed every aspect of American life, including especially the Southwest.

The Sheriff of Maricopa County

Carl Hayden's political career began at the dawn of the twentieth century, and almost immediately focused on improving and extending infrastructure, including especially water issues. In September 1900, recently returned from Stanford due to…

The Stalwart Pioneer

The Mexican-American War and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ceded much of what would become the American Southwest to the United States set in motion a long process of transformation. Many “aspiring landowners” knew of the fresh land and acts…

Monti's La Casa Vieja

Monti’s La Casa Vieja has been there since the beginning of Tempe. This building was first built by Charles Hayden. After seeing the river and the surrounding land he decided it would be a good place to build and settle. He built a general store, a…

Hayden House

The Hayden House, or La Casa Vieja as it came to be known, is the longest standing Mexican-adobe structure in Arizona. It was built in 1873 near the South bend of the Salt River. Originally constructed by local Mexican and indigenous craftsmen for…

Hayden Flour Mill

A little more than a hundred years ago, Tempe was all farmland.The Hayden Flour Mill that still stands at the north end of Mill Avenue reminds us of the agricultural roots of the city and the importance of water for human habitation of the region.…

San Pablo

The area in Tempe between College Avenue and Veterans Way, on the northside of University Drive, is currently home to several Arizona State University (ASU) buildings such as the Fulton Center, Mona Plummer Aquatic Center, as well as several popular…

Women Get the Vote

In the 19th century, women migrating to the west had opportunities not available to those in the East. These include the right to vote, equal pay for teachers, and more liberal divorce laws. Women confronted and supported the creation of the…

Building South Mountain

The Great Depression had a profound impact on the United States as well as greater Phoenix. In an effort to confront the economic and social costs of the Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt argued for a New Deal in which the federal…

Crossing the Salt River

Charles Trumbull Hayden came to the western half of the United States in search of economic gain and adventure like the many settlers before him. Shortly after the Gadsden Purchase in the 1850s, Charles Hayden opened a profitable general store in…

The Theodore Roosevelt Dam

Developed along the banks of the Salt River, the cities of Phoenix, Tempe, and Mesa, Arizona, both both depended on the river and feared its seasonal flooding. Controlling the river emerged as a central challenge to economic development in the Salt…

Central Arizona Project

The Salt River Valley has a long history of agricultural production. The ancient canal systems were hand built long before the age of electricity. Fast forward to 1920 and the round table of George H. Maxwell and Arizona state representative Fred T.…

Hohokam Canals

The Hohokam people lived in the Mesa area for nearly 1,500 years. Hohokam, (a Pima Indian word meaning ‘‘those who have disappeared’’), first appeared around 1 CE initially growing beans, squash, corn and cotton serving a very small population of…

Arizona Japanese Internment Camps

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 which gave permission for the War Department to relocate Japanese and Japanese-Americans living in the western United States to concentration camps. In March 1942, with…

Hayden Library

Charles Trumbull Hayden was born in 1825 in Hartford County, Connecticut. After moving from Connecticut to Missouri, he began working with a freighting business and traveled to Arizona frequently. In 1870, Charles Hayden and his business associates…
Tour imagined in Spring 2018 by students in HST 485 (History in the Wild): Jake Arend, Angel Castaneda, Tyler Cervenka, Allen Crowder, Kaitlin Eckenrode, Hunter Griffiths, Austin Keating, Kade Krauss, Samantha Notick, Sean Richards, Sierra Stewart, Joshua Storey, Rachel Storts, Wendy Trakes, and Troy Valdez. The team wishes to thank the Tempe History Museum--especially Josh Roffler and Jared Smith, Jay Mark, the ASU Libraries--especially Ed Oetting and Robert Spindler, and to John Southard (Tempe Historic Preservation Officer.)